Global Emergency Medicine Journal Club: A Social Media Discussion About the Lack of Association Between Press Ganey Scores and Emergency Department Analgesia

A healthcare social media research article published in Annals of Emergency Medicine, December 31, 2015

Title
Global Emergency Medicine Journal Club: A Social Media Discussion About the Lack of Association Between Press Ganey Scores and Emergency Department Analgesia
Authors (alpha)
Justin Hensley, Lauren Westafer, Michelle Lin, Sameed Shaikh
Published
December 31, 2015
Journal
Annals of Emergency Medicine
Impact Factor
4.676
DOI
10.1016/j.annemergmed.2015.04.012
Pubmed
26003003
Altmetric
A healthcare social media research article published in Annals of Emergency Medicine, December 31, 2015

Abstract

Annals of Emergency Medicine collaborated with an educational Web site, Academic Life in Emergency Medicine (ALiEM), to host a public discussion featuring the 2014 Annals article on the association between Press Ganey scores and emergency department (ED) analgesia by Schwartz et al. The objective was to curate a 14-day (December 1 through 14, 2014) worldwide academic dialogue among clinicians in regard to preselected questions about the article. Five online facilitators hosted the multimodal discussion on the ALiEM Web site, Twitter, and Google Hangout. Comments across the social media platforms were curated for this report, as framed by the 4 preselected questions. Engagement was tracked through Web analytic tools and analysis of tweets. Blog comments, tweets, and video expert commentary involving the featured article are summarized and reported. The dialogue resulted in 978 page views from 342 cities in 33 countries on the ALiEM Web site, 464,345 Twitter impressions, and 83 views of the video interview with experts. Of the unique 169 identified tweets, discussion (53.3%) and learning points (32.5%) were the most common category of tweets identified. Common themes that arose in the open-access multimedia discussions included Press Ganey data validity and the utility of patient satisfaction in determining pain treatment efficacy. This educational approach using social media technologies demonstrates a free, asynchronous means to engage a worldwide scholarly discourse.


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Altmetric

The Altmetric Attention Score is based on the attention a research article gets on the internet. Each coloured thread in the circle represents a different type of online attention and the number in the centre is the Altmetric Attention Score. The score is calculated based on two main sources of online attention: social media and mainstream news media.