JGME-ALiEM Hot Topics in Medical Education Online Journal Club: An Analysis of a Virtual Discussion About Resident Teachers

A healthcare social media research article published in Journal of Graduate Medical Education, August 31, 2015

Title
JGME-ALiEM Hot Topics in Medical Education Online Journal Club: An Analysis of a Virtual Discussion About Resident Teachers
Authors (alpha)
Jonathan Sherbino, Michelle Lin, Nikita Joshi
Published
August 31, 2015
Journal
Journal of Graduate Medical Education
DOI
10.4300/JGME-D-15-00071.1
Pubmed
26457152
Altmetric
A healthcare social media research article published in Journal of Graduate Medical Education, August 31, 2015

Abstract

In health professionals' education, senior learners play a key role in the teaching of junior colleagues. We describe an online discussion about residents as teachers to highlight the topic and the online journal club medium. In January 2015, the Journal of Graduate Medical Education (JGME) and the Academic Life in Emergency Medicine blog facilitated an open-access, online, weeklong journal club on the JGME article "What Makes a Great Resident Teacher? A Multicenter Survey of Medical Students Attending an Internal Medicine Conference." Social media platforms used to promote asynchronous discussions included a blog, a video discussion via Google Hangouts on Air, and Twitter. We performed a thematic analysis of the discussion. Web analytics were captured as a measure of impact. The blog post garnered 1324 page views from 372 cities in 42 countries. Twitter was used to endorse discussion points, while blog comments provided opinions or responded to an issue. The discussion focused on why resident feedback was devalued by medical students. Proposed explanations included feedback not being labeled as such, the process of giving delivery, the source of feedback, discrepancies with self-assessment, and threats to medical student self-image. The blog post resulted in a crowd-sourced repository of resident teacher resources. An online journal club provides a novel discussion forum across multiple social media platforms to engage authors, content experts, and the education community. Crowd-sourced analysis of the resident teacher role suggests that resident feedback to medical students is important, and barriers to student acceptance of feedback can be overcome.


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Altmetric

The Altmetric Attention Score is based on the attention a research article gets on the internet. Each coloured thread in the circle represents a different type of online attention and the number in the centre is the Altmetric Attention Score. The score is calculated based on two main sources of online attention: social media and mainstream news media.