Ten Steps for Setting Up an Online Journal Club

A healthcare social media research article published in Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, November 30, 2015

Title
Ten Steps for Setting Up an Online Journal Club
Authors (alpha)
Amalia Cochran, Brent Thoma, Henry H. Woo, Joel Topf, Lillian S. Kao, Michelle Lin, Ryan Radecki, Swapnil Hiremath, Teresa M. Chan
Published
November 30, 2015
Journal
Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions
Impact Factor
1.361
DOI
10.1002/chp.21275
Pubmed
26115115
Altmetric
A healthcare social media research article published in Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions, November 30, 2015

Abstract

Journal clubs have an extensive history that dates back to the time of Sir William Osler. They provide a venue to discuss the latest medical literature among groups of peers and are an innovative method for translating knowledge into practice within individual institutions. With advances in social media, journal clubs are poised to take an evolutionary step by harnessing digital connectivity. Online journal clubs are uniting hundreds of medical practitioners from around the world under the banner of one cause: enhancing knowledge translation of the medical literature without the limitations of geography. This article describes 10 steps for creating online journal clubs based on the experiences of a multidisciplinary team of clinicians and medical educators.


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Altmetric

The Altmetric Attention Score is based on the attention a research article gets on the internet. Each coloured thread in the circle represents a different type of online attention and the number in the centre is the Altmetric Attention Score. The score is calculated based on two main sources of online attention: social media and mainstream news media.